Work with Water » Amanda DeSonia Blogs About the Norwex Lifestyle

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Bone Broth in the Instant Pot.

Have you gotten on TeamInstantPot Yet?

The loyal and raving fans of this household helper might someday rival those of the Norwex products.

I picked up an Instant Pot almost a year ago after someone said words like “dinner faster less mess easy healthy.” I have no idea in which order, but I clicked “buy” 12 seconds later.

Some of you know I have food allergies and sensitivities and over-all gut health issues. It’s not the most sexy story, but one that is important to me because had I known food was the root cause of years of back pain, I could have avoided years of failed treatments and most of all, the hopelessness that comes with undiagnosed chronic pain.
bone_broth_instant_potPINIMAGEBut I’m good now! So when it comes to eating well, I have that part figured out. Sometimes I mess up. Once in awhile gluten sneaks into my foods,  or when my immune system is just in the dump, or when I am just going to make soup, those are the times I make and then reach for bone broth. Bone broth is what the cool kids call it. (It’s just soup broth made at home with the bones of good meat sources.)

Why bone broth? Well, its SO nourishing! So many of us are void of real minerals and vitamins due to the typical ‘Merican diet. I drink it by the mug because the collagen in bone broth is so healing for the sad gut. Inflammation is something I have to use food to fight off all the time.(In my younger days I tossed Advil down like Skittles, ugh, only further messing up my tummy!)

You can absolutely use your slow cooker to make broth, but after about the 16th hour of simmering, your house begins to smell like a Chicken Scented Yankee Candle. I like faster, so Instant Pot is what I choose to make broth.

My friend Megan directed me to Trader Joe’s whole chickens, which are organic and pretty affordable. You can even cook a whole chicken for dinner in the Instant Pot. Here is a recipe for that. Save the carcass and then strip the meat off the bone. Ideally you will make bone broth with 2-3 pounds of bones, so if you don’t have this at the start, you can save the bones in the freezer. You don’t have to just use chicken bones, it’s just what I most often have on-hand.

Add 2-3 lbs of bones to the Instant pot.

1-2 carrots

1 stalk celery

1/2-1 whole onion, quartered

1 clove garlic

1tsp sea salt

1 bay leaf

•Fill with water but leave 3 inches at the top. I like to use less water for a thicker, more gelatinous broth.

(I do also add in a glug of Apple Cider Vinegar, I have read this helps break down the bones, but seriously guys, my area of expertise is Norwex, not bones so IDK.)

•Once you have everything added, put on the lid and seal. Make sure your vent is in the sealing position.

•Push the manual button once. You’ll see the display light to indicate high pressure 30 minutes. Press the + button until it reaches 120. Wait 5 seconds, the pot will beep and the display will say ON. Now it’s heating up and building pressure, which takes about 30 minutes. After that the display will switch and start counting down from 120.

•After its cycle is over, it will switch over the “L” and keep your broth warm for up to 10 hours. You can leave it be and let the steam naturally release while you are gone, but I give it at least 1 full hour to sit.  If you are in some crazy hurry you can quick release and push the knob to venting, but look out. This is the only scary part of a the new modern pressure cooker. That steam is hot and it comes out like mad. Keep your body parts away and shoot it away from your counters so you aren’t bathing them in steam.

•Remove the lid, now it’s time to skim out your veggies. I use a fine mesh strainer like this one. I simply set the strainer over a big bowl and pour the broth contents of the Instant Pot through the strainer and into the bowl.

•I let everything cool down and sit for about 15 minutes. Then it’s time to transfer to glass jars. Mason jars work great, of course. I suggest putting into glass jars of different sizes.  Half pints are great when you have a sick kiddo and want to thaw out a single serving. Pint and quart jars are awesome for soup nights.

•That let cool part, I was serious about that. Lid the jars and freeze when the broth is still hot and you will have busted glass jars of bone broth in your freezer. Yes, I did that once. SAD FACE.

(You can store in the fridge for about 5 days, or freeze for 9-12 months)

Do you make broth? Got any tips to share? Let me know!